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What are Sober Living Homes?


Sober living homes are group homes for addicts. Most of these homes are privately owned, although some group homes are owned by businesses and may even be owned by charity organizations. Homes are usually located in a quiet area to help ensure a peaceful environment for addicts to recover.


These types of homes are different from rehab centers; rehab centers usually offer a more intensive recovery experience and give residents less freedom. People who live in sober living facilities can usually come and go as they please as long as they follow certain rules. For example, sober living houses may require residents to be home by a certain time or to go to work during the day. Residents are also usually subject to random drug tests to prove that they are sober.


Who Lives in Sober Living Homes?

People who live in these types of facilities are expected to be responsible for themselves. This is an important step in recovery because addiction causes people to act in irresponsible ways, and the friends and families of addicts often enable them by supporting them. People living in sober homes usually have to pay their own rent, buy their own food and do the same things they would do for themselves if they lived in a regular home. However, they also have to submit to random drug testing and follow certain rules.


What types of rules do you encounter in Sober Living Homes?


Although most halfway houses do not restrict who may apply to live there, the majority of residents have gone through a rehab program before going to sober living. This makes sense because residents must be able to stay sober in order to live in this type of home. Thus, recovering addicts who already have some sobriety under their belt and some tools to help them stay sober are more likely to succeed at sober living than those who are new to recovery.

Although this is the best path to take, it is not usually an absolute requirement. Most sober living homes will accept residents who are new to the rehab process as long as those residents are willing to stay sober and live by the other house rules. At the very least, however, residents should have already completed any detox program required to cure physical addiction so they are not acutely ill and unable to work while living in the sober house.


How much do Sober Living Houses Cost?

Prices vary for staying in halfway houses, but most of the time it costs about the same as it would cost to live in a modest apartment or home. Sober living residents must pay rent each month. The rent usually amounts to between $450 and $750 per month, depending on where the home is located. Residents have to pay rent on time, but they do not have to pay first and last month's rent. They also do not have to pay for utilities in most sober homes, although they may get in trouble if they over-use utilities.

Living in a halfway house is generally cheaper than living in rehab because staff provides fewer services. Residents still have to attend 12-step program meetings on a regular basis and may have to see a therapist while living at a sober living home, but they do not have to attend intensive therapy sessions. This helps bring the cost down. In addition, most sober homes try to ensure that residents can afford to live there so people who desire to stay sober are able to have a safe environment in which to do so.


If you or someone you love is struggling with drug or alcohol addiction, a sober living house may be the right solution. These types of homes help residents stay sober by keeping expectations high and giving them support while allowing them to resume normal activities such as working or going to school. Residents can also get support from one another in the home and make new friends who are committed to sobriety.

Sober living homes are not for everybody; some people may need to go through detox or rehab before they can successfully live in a sober environment. However, these homes provide a supportive place to transition from the addictive lifestyle to one of sobriety and responsibility. People who have gotten sober and want to stay that way should consider moving into a halfway house or homes dedicated to sober living. Living in this type of home can aid sobriety and make it more likely that recovering addicts will remain in recovery for the long term.

© The Passageway to Peace 2016